Running multiple Homestead boxes next to each other (PHP 7 and PHP 5.6)

Now that PHP 7 is being adopted by more and more web applications in production environments, dealing with legacy code in local development becomes increasingly more difficult because of the different PHP versions out there and deprecated functionality. The reason I’m writing this article is that for a big project, we’re planning a migration from PHP 5.6.15 to PHP 7.x, but had some issues with the legacy mcrypt extension (which we adapted from Laravel 4.2) in local development.

The mcrypt extension has been abandonware for nearly a decade now, and was also fairly complex to use. It has therefore been deprecated in favour of OpenSSL, where it will be removed from the core and into PECL in PHP 7.2.

I’ve been using Laravel homestead for years now because it’s such an easy tool for Laravel development. But it’s not that easy to setup a 2nd Laravel box, with an older PHP version. In this blog I’ll show you how to do it. Hopefully it will help other developers.

I’m assuming you already have a Homestead box up & running. Make a backup of your Homestead.yaml configs and save it someplace safe, because we’re going to start all over just to make sure. All your code is hosted locally anyway so you’re not going to lose anything, unless you made custom changes to the VM which is not a good idea anyway.

Remove all boxes:

vagrant global-status --prune
 
id       name        provider   state   directory
----------------------------------------------------------------------------
2d2e481  homestead56 virtualbox running /Users/Chris/Homestead56
1042da7  homestead7  virtualbox running /Users/Chris/Homestead
 
vagrant destroy [id]

Now let’s setup our new VM’s:

vagrant box add laravel/homestead
vagrant box add laravel/homestead --box-version 0.3.3

Pull in Homestead:

cd ~
 
git clone https://github.com/laravel/homestead.git Homestead
 
git clone https://github.com/laravel/homestead.git Homestead56

Here’s the tricky part, edit ~/Homestead56/init.sh, change the homesteadRoot variable. Otherwise it will try to overwrite the file in the other Homestead folder.

#!/usr/bin/env bash
 
homesteadRoot=~/.homestead56
 
mkdir -p "$homesteadRoot"
 
cp -i src/stubs/Homestead.yaml "$homesteadRoot/Homestead.yaml"
cp -i src/stubs/after.sh "$homesteadRoot/after.sh"
cp -i src/stubs/aliases "$homesteadRoot/aliases"
 
echo "Homestead initialized!"

Next run:

bash Homestead/init.sh
bash Homestead56/init.sh

This will publish the config files to ~/.homestead/ and ~/.homestead56/.
In order for both environments to function properly we’ll have to make a couple of changes to the Homestead.yaml files.

~/.homestead/Homestead.yaml:

--
ip: "192.168.10.10"
name: "homestead7"
memory: 2048
cpus: 1
provider: virtualbox
 
authorize: ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub
 
keys:
    - ~/.ssh/id_rsa
 
folders:
    - map: ~/Sites
      to: /home/vagrant/Sites
 
sites:
    - map: randomapp.app
      to: /home/vagrant/Sites/randomapp/public
 
databases:
    - homestead

~/.homestead56/Homestead.yaml:

---
ip: "192.168.10.11"
name: "homestead56"
version: 0.3.3
memory: 2048
cpus: 1
provider: virtualbox
 
authorize: ~/.ssh/id_rsa.pub
 
keys:
    - ~/.ssh/id_rsa
 
folders:
    - map: ~/Sites
      to: /home/vagrant/Sites
 
sites:
    - map: randomapp.app
      to: /home/vagrant/Sites/randomapp/public
 
databases:
    - homestead

As you can see we’re setting up different IP’s for the VM’s (duh), specifying an easy-to-remember name, and most important of all, we’re setting the VM versions. These define what PHP version will be installed.

Bonus, symlink your vagrant commands to your VM environments.

vim ~/.bash_profile

# Homestead
function homestead() {
    ( cd ~/Homestead && vagrant $* )
}
function homestead7() {
    ( cd ~/Homestead && vagrant $* )
}
function homestead56() {
    ( cd ~/Homestead56 && vagrant $* )
}

Now you can do something like:

homestead56 up
homestead56 ssh
 
homestead7 up
homestead7 ssh

If you want more information on the available PHP / Homestead versions, try these links:
https://laravel.com/docs/5.4/homestead#old-versions
https://laravel-news.com/using-older-versions-of-homestead

Pushing Laravel logs to Loggly

logo_loggly

Laravel uses the Monolog logging library for logging, however, it’s saving all logs to a local directory by default. Not a very useful thing in a production environment.

That’s where Loggly comes into play. Loggly acts as a central (cloud)platform that can receive logs from a multitude of platforms such as php frameworks (Laravel being the one), operating systems, their own Loggly API, and a lot of other frameworks and services. In this short tutorial I’ll show you how to implement Loggly into your multi-environment Laravel project.

1) Update composer

First we need to update composer so we’re 100% that we’re using the latest Monolog version, because older versions don’t support Loggly.

composer self-update
composer update

2) Setup Loggly account

Go to https://www.loggly.com and create a (free) account.

3) Add Loggly credentials to your Laravel environment

Now the nice thing about Loggly is that it’s pretty easy to configure. Go to https://www.loggly.com/tokens and setup a token for your project. Do this to keep things seperated. Got a big project? Then you might want to use source groups as well.
Now create a new file in your Laravel folder: /app/config/services.php and add this:

return array(
	// credentials for loggly.com
	'loggly' => array(
		'key'	=> 'xxxxxxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxx-xxxxxxxxxx',
		'tag'	=> 'ProjectName_' .strtolower(App::environment()),
	),
);

Now if you’re using Laravel’s environment configuration you should do this:

return array(
	// credentials for loggly.com
	'loggly' => array(
		'key'	=> getenv('services.loggly.key'),
		'tag'	=> 'ProjectName_' .strtolower(App::environment()),
	),
);

And then store it in a similar way in your .env.local.php file, or on Laravel Forge.

4) Install the logging code

Now this is where the magic happens. Open up /app/start/global.php and find the “Application Error Logger” section. Replace it with this code:

/*
|--------------------------------------------------------------------------
| Application Error Logger
|--------------------------------------------------------------------------
|
| Here we will configure the error logger setup for the application which
| is built on top of the wonderful Monolog library. By default we will
| build a rotating log file setup which creates a new file each day.
|
*/
 
$logFile = 'log-'.php_sapi_name().'.txt';
Log::useDailyFiles(storage_path().'/logs/'.$logFile);
 
/*
 * Setup Loggly Handler
 */
$handler = new \Monolog\Handler\LogglyHandler(Config::get('services.loggly.key'),\Monolog\Logger::DEBUG);
$handler->setTag(Config::get('services.loggly.tag'));
 
$logger = Log::getMonolog();
$logger->pushHandler($handler);

This way, every environment will have it’s own tag and you can easily see in the Loggly dashboard when something happens on your dev/staging environment, or if it’s on live. I also strongly advise to setup alerts within Loggly so you get notified once you got a couple of 500 errors coming around.
Now the nice thing about Loggly is that you can go back in time and easily see in the stats how many errors occured in the past 24 hours, good luck doing that with log files! This is especially useful for keeping a close eye on cronjobs and incoming API calls.

5) Testing

Throw some 404 errors by opening up a page in your project and appending some random characters. Wait a couple of minutes and there we go. You should see something like this:
Screen Shot 2014-10-02 at 11.05.36

Also worth noting is that all other Laravel logging functions will also push to Loggly.

More info about Laravel’s logging features: http://laravel.com/docs/4.2/errors#logging
More info about Loggly: https://www.loggly.com

php-invoiceocean, a PHP client to interact with the InvoiceOcean.com API

It’s been a while since I created a public PHP library to interact with another API but here we go.

php-invoiceocean is a PHP client to communicatie with the InvoiceOcean.com API.

What is InvoicingOcean?

“The easiest way to online invoicing”. Over 70 000 companies are using the InvoiceOcean software. The application’s simplicity and intuitive interface is aimed at quick and efficient invoice issuing. Because of the SaaS environment, your data is securely stored in the Cloud and available to access from anywhere in the world. Whether you are a small or medium business owner or an individual entrepreneur, InvoiceOcean will make your work easier.

A few facts

– it’s RESTful
– works with Json exclusively (although they have XML api’s, I like Json more)
– it’s pretty smart in a way that you only have to define the method names, no parameter or http method checking
– works with composer (obviously)

Clone this repo @ https://github.com/kryap/php-invoiceocean

How to use?

composer require kryap/php-invoiceocean
./composer.json has been updated
Loading composer repositories with package information
Updating dependencies (including require-dev)
- Installing kryap/php-invoiceocean (dev-master a8ccf4d)
Cloning a8ccf4dfd3b8daa611087822f27da2a773c073ce
 
Writing lock file
Generating autoload files
Generating optimized class loader

Here’s how you could use it:

<?php
 
$io = new InvoiceOceanClient('username', 'api_token_goes_here');
$clients = $io->getClients();
 
var_dump($clients);
 
?>

Need more documentation about the InvoiceOcean API?

Visit these links:

Raspberry Pi PLC/Domotica testcase

Here’s a quick tutorial on how to build a hardware on/off switch which sends this signals to a RESTful web API using Raspberry PI with Raspbian. This is in fact a small PLC testcase (proof of concept). The possibilities are in fact endless!
I’m planning to use this to monitor certain events around my house. E.g. is a door open/closed? Is a device on/off?

Download & install Raspberry

Download the latest version of Raspbian onto your Raspberry PI SD card:
http://www.raspberrypi.org/downloads

Updates & depencies

Do some updates + install extra depencies:

apt-get update
apt-get install python, py-pycurl

Setup the hardware

In order to know the GPIO’s pins you’ll have to find the input/output pins. Here’s a map:

raspberry-gpio
Connect your Raspberry’s GPIO (the big black serial thing) to some switch or toggle. Here’s how I did it (testcase):

raspberry-pi-gpio-switch

We actually need 3 pins. One for I/O, one for power, and one for grounding (safety first!). Make sure you solder the right cable to the right GPIO pin (see map above).

Now you might experience the naming of these pins are confusing. That’s because there’s 3 type’s of naming conventions used here..

Pin Numbers RPi.GPIO Raspberry Pi Name BCM2835
P1_01 1 3V3
P1_02 2 5V0
P1_03 3 SDA0 GPIO0
P1_04 4 DNC
P1_05 5 SCL0 GPIO1
P1_06 6 GND
P1_07 7 GPIO7 GPIO4
P1_08 8 TXD GPIO14
P1_09 9 DNC
P1_10 10 RXD GPIO15
P1_11 11 GPIO0 GPIO17
P1_12 12 GPIO1 GPIO18
P1_13 13 GPIO2 GPIO21
P1_14 14 DNC
P1_15 15 GPIO3 GPIO22
P1_16 16 GPIO4 GPIO23
P1_17 17 DNC
P1_18 18 GPIO5 GPIO24
P1_19 19 SPI_MOSI GPIO10
P1_20 20 DNC
P1_21 21 SPI_MISO GPIO9
P1_22 22 GPIO6 GPIO25
P1_23 23 SPI_SCLK GPIO11
P1_24 24 SPI_CE0_N GPIO8
P1_25 25 DNC
P1_26 26 SPI_CE1_N GPIO7

Anyway, let’s move on and try & catch the GPIO’s input using python.

Read GPIO signals using Python

plc.py (daemon script)

import RPi.GPIO as GPIO
import time
import os
 
buttonPin = 07
GPIO.setmode(GPIO.BOARD)
GPIO.setup(buttonPin,GPIO.IN)
 
while True:
  if (GPIO.input(buttonPin)):
    os.system("sudo python /home/pi/plc_handle.py")
    #print "button called"

plc_handle.py

import time
import RPi.GPIO as GPIO
import datetime
import pycurl, json
 
buttonPin = 07
GPIO.setmode(GPIO.BOARD)
GPIO.setup(buttonPin,GPIO.IN)
 
# reset state
last_state = -1
 
while True:
  input = GPIO.input(buttonPin)
  now = datetime.datetime.now()
 
  # check if value changed
  if (input != last_state) :
    	print "Button state is changed:",input, " @ ",now
	api_url = "webserver.com/api/input.php"
	data = "location_id=1&amp;status=%s" % input
	c = pycurl.Curl()
	c.setopt(pycurl.URL, api_url)
	c.setopt(pycurl.POST, 1)
	c.setopt(pycurl.POSTFIELDS, data)
	c.perform()
 
  # update previous input
  last_state = input
 
  # slight pause to debounce
  time.sleep(1)

You can run this script doing this:

sudo python /home/pi/plc.py

Or add it to /etc/rc.local (so it runs after each reboot)

python /home/pi/plc.py
exit 0

Web API

Here’s a quick (and unsafe) ‘API’ script for receiving the Raspberry signals:
input.php

<?
header('Cache-Control: no-cache, must-revalidate');
header('Expires: Mon, 26 Jul 1997 05:00:00 GMT');
header('Content-type: application/json');
 
$dbh = new PDO('mysql:host=localhost; dbname=database', 'username', 'password');
 
$response = array(
    'status'    => 'nok'
);
 
if(!Empty($_POST['location_id']))
{
    $status = $_POST['status'];
    $location_id = $_POST['location_id'];
 
    // create log
    $sql = "INSERT INTO status_log (location_id, status, created_at, updated_at) VALUES (:location_id, :status, NOW(), NOW())";
    $q = $dbh->prepare($sql);
    $q->execute(array(':location_id' => $location_id,
                      ':status'      => $status));
 
    // update location  
    $sql = "UPDATE location SET status=:status, updated_at=NOW() WHERE id=:location_id";
    $q = $dbh->prepare($sql);
    $q->execute(array(':location_id' => $location_id,
                      ':status'      => $status));
 
    // output
    $response = array(
        'status'    => 'ok'
    ); 
}
 
echo json_encode($response);
?>

 
Now I’m very curious what sort of applications you guys are building with this Raspberry Pi “plc implementation”. Feel free to post them in the comments section.

Usefull links

 

Laravel DirectAdmin bundle

I recently started playing with the Laravel PHP framework and my god I love it! So fast and so easy.. yet you have total freedom!
Anyway I wrote my first bundle for Laravel (a bundle is something like a package you can use in multiple projects) which is an implementation of the DirectAdmin API.

You can download it from github (https://github.com/kryap/laravel-directadmin) or use the laravel artisan tool:

php artisan bundle:install directadmin

Now you only have to tell your Laravel application you want to use this bundle so add this to application/bundles.php:

return array(
    ...
    'directadmin' => array(
        'auto'  => true
    ),
    ...
);

You might want to change the config/settings.php default values in case you’ll just access 1 static DA server.

return array(
    'host'          => '127.0.0.1',
    'port'          => 2222,
    'login'         => '',
    'password'      => ''
);

And you’re ready to play with it! Get an instance:

$da = IoC::resolve('DirectAdmin');

And fetch some DA info:

$da->set_method('get');
$da->query('/CMD_API_POP',
    array(
        'domain' => 'domain.com',
        'action' => 'list'
    ));
$da = $da->fetch_body();

By the way, make sure you read the DirectAdmin API docs @ http://www.directadmin.com/api.html

Facebox and remote ajax pages solution

While facebox allows you to load remote pages via ajax, it doesn’t allow you to load ‘real remote’ pages from a different domain due to cross-domain policy. This is where jsonp comes in place.

Here’s a fix for facebox (current version 1.3).
Open up facebox.js and search for the ‘fillFaceboxFromAjax’ function. Now replace

$.get(href, function(data) { $.facebox.reveal(data, klass) })

with

$.ajax({
   url: href,
   dataType: 'jsonp',
   error: function(xhr, status, error) {
      alert(error);
   },
   success: jsonpCallback
});

And add a callback function:

function jsonpCallback(response){
   $.facebox.reveal(response.data, '');
}

Now this will only work if you also modify the remote file you’re calling. Make sure it will look something like this:

header('content-type: application/json; charset=utf-8');
$data = array(
   'data' => $generatedoutput,
);
$json = json_encode($data);
 
echo isset($_GET['callback']) ? "{$_GET['callback']}($json)" : $json;

Where $generatedoutput is your actual data (in this case I use ob_start and ob_get_contents for ease).
$_GET[‘callback’] is a parameter which is added automaticly by jquery. Read their docs for more info: http://api.jquery.com/jQuery.ajax/

Open folder in Sublime on Mac

Here’s a short snippet for Sublime on Mac. Use this to open a folder in Sublime.

Via Finder
Open Automater and add a new shell script, here’s a screen

/Applications/Sublime\ Text\ 2.app/Contents/SharedSupport/bin/subl -n $@

Via Terminal

ln -s /Applications/Sublime\ Text\ 2.app/Contents/SharedSupport/bin/subl /usr/local/bin/sublime

jQuery anchor detection

Here’s a snippet to catch the anchor # in url’s with jQuery and do something with it. I needed this for ultra simple jQuery tabs.

$(document).ready(function() {
	// for page reload
	if(window.location.hash.length > 1) {
		// hash is found, similate click
		$('.tabs a[rel=' +window.location.hash.substring(1)+ ']').click();
	}
});
 
// dynamic change
$(window).bind('hashchange', function() {
	// hash is found, similate click
	$('.tabs a[rel=' +window.location.hash.substring(1)+ ']').click();
});